Sourdough Bread Using a Stand Mixer

With this superbly crispy crust and soft and chewy interior, the flavor and aroma of this delicious sourdough bread will have you wishing you had made an extra loaf.

Sourdough Bread Using a Stand Mixer

You will need a sourdough starter to do this recipe. If you don’t have a starter, don’t worry, you can make your own, just as I do. Here is my simple sourdough starter recipe.

If you already have a starter, you need to feed it the day before you plan to bake this bread. You will need 200 grams of starter + extra to ensure that you don’t run out of starter!

Using a Stand Mixer

There are days when I want to bake sourdough bread, but I don’t have the energy to make all the mixing process. Therefore, today I’m going to share with you how I bake sourdough bread using a stand mixer. But of course, you can still prepare the dough entirely by hand.

75% Hydration

This recipe makes a sourdough bread 75% hydration. It is high but moderate hydration. Today, we will take a step further, and we will see how to work with higher hydration using a stand mixer and make a good batard.

Sourdough Bread Using a Stand Mixer

Feel free to reduce the water content a little while you get used to handling and shaping the high hydration dough. Less water will give a firmer, more manageable dough while you master the techniques.

Quick Notes

  • The higher the hydration, the faster the dough rises. Therefore, you must control the fermentation time because it can be faster than you assume.
  • A high hydration dough is best scored after being in the fridge because the dough hardens slightly.

If you also hate throwing your sourdough discard, check out these recipes that use sourdough discard.

Sourdough Bread Using a Stand Mixer

Come, let’s get starter!

If you have tried this recipe or any other recipe on my blog, please don’t forget to rate the recipe and let me know how you got on in the comments below. I love hearing from you! 😊

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You will need:

Overnight starter

  • 20 grams sourdough starter (100% hydration)
  • 80 grams bread flour
  • 30 grams whole wheat flour
  • 110 grams water

Overnight autolyse

  • 350 grams water
  • 450 grams bread flour
  • 50 grams whole wheat flour

Other

  • 15 grams fine sea salt

Procedure (video):

The evening before baking

  1. Prepare the sourdough starter in advance. Let sit for 4 to 12 hours, until it has risen and a small portion passes the float test.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, mix well flours and water either with your hands, a sturdy wooden spoon, or a spatula until you have a big, sticky, shaggy dough and no dry flour remains anywhere. Cover with a damp kitchen towel and leave to hydrate overnight on your countertop.

The next day

  1. When the starter has doubled and passed the float test, now it’s time to add it to the autolyse dough.
  2. Using a flat beater attachment, mix the autolyse dough and active and bubbly sourdough starter for 2 minutes or until well incorporated. Then cover with plastic wrap and let the dough rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.
  3. After 30 minutes, wet your hands and perform a gluten stretch test.
  4. Add salt to the dough mixture, then change the attachment to a dough hook. Knead the dough for 5 minutes or until the dough slips from the edges.
  5. Perform another gluten stretch test to check if your dough is ready for long bulk fermentation.
  6. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and transfer to a lightly greased bowl or plastic tub. Cover with a lid or plastic wrap and leave it at room temperature for 1 hour. I recommend placing a rubber band around the outside of your container at the level of the dough. It will then easy to see when the dough has risen double its size.

Bulk fermentation

  1. First Coil and fold: Using your wet hands on both sides, scoop your fingers under the dough. Lift the dough and allow it to stretch, then fold the dough over itself. Rotate the dough 90 degrees and repeat the process on four sides—Puff all the bubble air. Using your instant-read thermometer, check the temperature of the dough. The right dough temperature should be around 23C or 74F. If the dough temperature is low, you should increase your bulk period and vice versa. Cover and let the dough rest for 1 hour.
  2. Second Coil and fold: Using your wet hands on both sides, scoop your fingers under the dough. Lift the dough and allow it to stretch, then fold the dough over itself. Rotate the dough 90 degrees and repeat the process on four sides—Puff all the bubble air. Using your instant-read thermometer, check the temperature of the dough. The right dough temperature should be around 23C or 74F. If the dough temperature is low, you should increase your bulk period and vice versa. Cover and let the dough rest, undisturbed for 2 hours, or until it doubles in size.
  3. Meanwhile, you can now prepare your banneton basket.

Pre-shape

  1. After 2 hours, transfer the dough to your working surface, without flour, and shape it into a ball. Be careful not to degas too much. Cover and let rest for 30 minutes.

Shaping

  1. Very lightly dust the top of the dough and your work surface with flour; turn the dough over onto the flour using a bench scraper. The top side should now be downwards and in contact with the floured work surface, and you should have the sticky side facing upwards.
  2. Stretch the bottom of your dough and fold in an upwards motion to the center. Then stretch and fold the right side over the left side and do the same to the right side. Finally, roll the dough from the bottom to the top and gently seal the sides and bottom. This shaping technique takes practice. I advise watching my video tutorial here for visual guidance.
  3. Gently place the shaped dough into the prepared banneton with the seam facing up. Cover with a shower cap or put them into a plastic bag and close tightly with a clip or rubber band. Transfer them to the fridge and rest for 12 to 18 hours (overnight).

Baking

  1. Preheat oven to 260 degrees Celcius (500F) for 1 hour and 10 minutes. When you are done preheating your oven, take one dough out of the fridge.
  2. Sprinkle rice flour on the dough before removing it from the banneton. Place a piece of parchment paper over the banneton and flip it out onto the cold cast iron pot, carefully removing the dough from the banneton.
  3. Use a sharp bread lame or razor blade cut deep to allow the bread to rise while baking. Move quickly and don’t be afraid to cut the bread. 
  4. Be careful, and use the parchment’s sides to lift the bread and place it into the hot cast iron pan or dutch oven.
  5. Place the lid back and bake the dough for 20 minutes.
  6. After 20 minutes, remove the lid and lower the heat to 230 degrees Celsius (450F) and bake for another 20 minutes.
  7. Allow the bread to cool completely on a cooling rack before slicing it. Preferably let it cool for 4-12 hours for the best flavor, texture and to prevent the bread from being gummy.
 

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2 Comments

  1. I notice you weighted the dough and leaven before mixing! What was the amount in grams of the active starter/ leaven that you added to the autolyse dough? Was there a certain grams amount?

     
  2. Performed the gluten stretch test and its breaking apart after 2 hours of stretch and fold. Added yeast and a bit more flour. Kneaded for 10 mins on mixer and its still the same. What should i do?

     

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