Purple Yam Sourdough Bread

After my first attempt at making sourdough bread, I am now confident to try a little bit tricky sourdough bread recipe. I also received shaping bannetons from my daughter as her Mother’s gift to me. 😍😊

Sourdough Bread Trial #2 Purple Yam Open Crumb Sourdough Bread (81% hydration)

I still don’t have a dutch oven ☹ ; therefore, I used my Romertopf baking clay for baking this Purple Yam Sourdough Bread. And I was very please with the oven spring. 👍

Sourdough Bread Trial #2 Purple Yam Open Crumb Sourdough Bread (81% hydration)
Sourdough Bread Trial #2 Purple Yam Open Crumb Sourdough Bread (81% hydration)
Sourdough Bread Trial #2 Purple Yam Open Crumb Sourdough Bread (81% hydration)

For more visuals and guidance, please watch my new step-by-step YouTube video and follow my sourdough bread video journey.

But this time, I will change some things up. After my first sourdough bread, I read and watch Richard Makin’s (the owner of the School Night Vegan blog) recipe and video tutorials for his Sourdough bread for beginners. I’ve also watched Full Proof Baking sourdough baking tutorials on her YouTube channel. I wrote some notes, and I am now crossing my finger to get more open crumbs from these sourdough baking techniques. 😃

Sourdough Bread Trial #2 Purple Yam Open Crumb Sourdough Bread (81% hydration)
Happy kid her! 😃

Quick notes before you start

  • My sourdough starter for this recipe is made with 80% high protein bread flour and 20% whole wheat flour, which yields an airy, chewy, and open crumb.
  • Many sourdough bread recipes call for preparing an off-shoot starter for baking. I prefer to use a portion of my ripe, just peaked starter.
  • Your sourdough starter should pass the float test before using it in your dough. If it sinks, it is not ready to use and usually requires additional time.
  • Please watch my step-by-step YouTube video before getting started. For a printable recipe and example baking timeline, please scroll down to the recipe box at the bottom of this post.
  • Please always keep in mind that flours differ around the world. Yours may need more or less liquid than mine, just as your oven may behave differently from mine.
  • This sourdough bread recipe offers a rough timeline but will need to be adapted to meet your specific conditions. Ambient temperature. starter strength and flour type affect fermentation and play a very important role in bread baking.
  • Sourdough bread baking is a learning process and requires a lot of patience and trial and error.

Important tips and tricks

  • I keep my starter at 100% hydration, so this recipe is a very wet dough, so don’t freak out if your hands get a bit doughy. If you really want to get the open crumb, you need to use a higher hydration starter. Shaping this bread was incredibly difficult. The dough becomes very sticky and a little slacker. If you want to learn more about sourdough hydration, I recommend visiting this site – True Sourdough: Sourdough Hydration Explained.
  • Use a dough or bench scraper to assist you when lifting, shaping, and transferring the dough.
  • Always wet your hands when working with your dough.
  • Remember to flour your shaping basket before transferring your dough into it.

Sourdough Starter

To make homemade sourdough bread, you will need an active, mature sourdough starter. If you don’t have a starter, please check out my simple sourdough starter recipe.

Please refer to my page – Common Baking and Cooking Conversions if you’re using other baking measurements.

If you have tried this recipe or any other recipe on my blog, please don’t forget to rate the recipe and let me know how you got on in the comments below. I love hearing from you! 😊 You can also follow me on PinterestInstagramFacebook, and YouTube to see what I am getting up to.

You will need:

  • 350 grams high gluten bread flour
  • 90 grams bread flour
  • 350 grams water, lukewarm around 30 to 35 degrees Celcius
  • 1 tbsp ube extract
  • 90 grams sourdough starter 100% hydration, active and bubbly
  • 9 grams fine sea salt
  • semolina or rice flour, for dusting

Procedure (video):

Day 1 – 8:30 am
Prepare the sourdough starter in advance. My sourdough starter is ready to bake after 6 hours. Replenish your starter with fresh flour and water, and store it according to preference. 

Day 1 – 10:30 am: Autolyse
1 to 2 hours before your starter is ready to prepare your autolyse.

In a large bowl, mix flour, ube extract, and water using your wet hand or a spatula until you have a big, sticky, shaggy dough. Cover with a damp tea-towel and leave to hydrate for 1 to 2 hours at room temperature, around 23C or 74F. This step hydrates the flours and helps with gluten development and dough structure. I leave my flour and water mixture to rest for 1 hour.

Day 1 – 11:30 am: Add the Active Starter
Add your starter into your autolyse, and using your wet fingertips, spread the starter over the autolyse moisture. Start mixing and using your thumb and fingers pinch your dough repeatedly until the starter is well incorporated (using the Pincer method), about 5 minutes. Cover and let it rest for 30 minutes at room temperature. Replenish your starter with fresh flour and water, and store it according to preference. 

Day 1 – 12:05 pm: Sprinkle fine sea salt
Wet your hand, then sprinkle the fine sea salt over the surface of the dough. Use your thumb and fingers to pinch and incorporate the salt into the dough, about 5 minutes (you should not feel any granules at the end of the mixing). Or you can also use the Rubaud method for mixing your salt. Cover and let it rest for 30 minutes at room temperature.

Day 1 – 12:40 pm: Stretch and fold
Lightly mist the countertop with water—wet your hand and bench scraper. Transfer the purple yam dough to the countertop. Pull and fold the dough over itself and do this step to all sides. Then flip over and shape into a round dough. Return to the same bowl. Cover and let it rest for 30 minutes.

Day 1 – 1:10 pm: Lamination
Lightly mist the countertop with water and wet your hand and the bench scraper. Transfer the dough onto the countertop. Gently pull from the center out to form a rectangle shape. Fold the left side to the center and do the same on the right side. Take the far, short end of the dough, fold it over to the center, and do the same on the bottom end. Transfer the dough into a low-side cookie baking dish. Cover with a shower cap; if you don’t have one, you can cover the dough with a plastic bag then seal with a clip. Let rest for 60 minutes.

Day 1 – 2:10 pm1. Coil Fold
Using your wet hand on both sides, scoop your fingers under the dough. Lift the dough and allow it to stretch, then fold the dough over itself. Rotate the dough 90 degrees and repeat the process on four sides—Puff all the bubble air. Using your instant-read thermometer, immediately check the temperature of the dough. The right dough temperature should be around 23C or 74F. If the dough temperature is low, you should increase your bulk period and vice versa. Cover the dish and let the dough rest for 60 minutes, or it depends on your dough temperature.

Day 1 – 3:10 pm: 2. Coil Fold
Do the same procedure on the previous coil fold method. Cover the dish and let the dough rest for 4 to 6 hours, depends on your dough temperature. My dough temperature was around 22C or 72F, so I will let my dough rest for 5 hours.

Day 1 – 8:10 pm: Shape and room temperature proofing
You can now prepare your oblong bannetons. Take a piece of clean cloth and place it inside the bannetons. Sprinkle with some rice flour.

Lightly flour
 your countertop then coat your fingertips with flour and gently released the top of the dough from the dish. Flip the dish over and let the dough release on its own. Using a bench scraper, tuck the flour around the dough edges and discard the excess flour from the counter.

Using a bench scrape, gently shape the dough into a rough rectangle shape. Once you achieved the shape, use the bench scraper to pick up one side of the dough and gently pull it and fold it over to the center. Repeat the same pull and fold on the other side. Gently pat down the dough to release some of the large bubbles.

Using your floured hand, roll up the dough, from the top down using your thumbs to tuck the dough into itself. Finally, use your fingers to seam the bottom of the dough. Pinch the seams to close the dough.

Use your bench scraper to lift up the dough and gently transfer it seam-side up into your prepared banneton (the smooth top of the dough should be facing dough).

Dust the top of the dough with a little flour, drape a lined over the banneton (to capture any condensation), and place the banneton into a plastic bag. Seal with a clip and proof the dough at room temperature for 20 minutes.

Day 1 – 8:30 pm: Cold retard or Overnight fridge proof
Then retard overnight in the fridge for 12 to 18 hours. This slow and cold fermentation stage helps develop flavor and improves the final crust texture.

Day 2 – 8:30 am: Heat the oven
Cut a sheet of parchment paper to fit the size of your baking pot, leaving enough excess around the sides to remove the bread. One hour before your bread has finished fermenting, you need to make sure your oven is good and hot. You also want your dutch oven or baking cloche is very hot too.

Place your dutch oven or baking cloche in the oven. Turn your oven to 250 degrees Celcius (500F). Leave to heat up for 1 hour.

Day 2 – 9:30 am:Poke test, Transfer, score, and bake
Remove your dutch oven or baking cloche from the hot oven. Remove the top or lid and sprinkle some semolina or rice flour onto the hot baking surface or you can always use a parchment paper.

Remove the dough from the fridge. Test the dough for proper proofing by lightly flouring (rice flour or semolina flour, this is also to avoid sticking to the parchment paper) the top of the dough. Then press your finger lightly into the dough. A propper proofed dough should very SLOWLY spring back and still leave a slight indentation. If the dough compresses and doesn’t spring back at all, it is over-proofed. Unfortunately, at this point, it is hard to make up for in that stage of the process, but the bread will still taste delicious.

Lightly dust the top of the dough with rice flour and place the parchment paper over the dough and invert the bowl or banneton to release. Drizzle some rice flour over the dough and using a curved razor blade or blade, score the dough at least 1.5 cm (1/2 inch) deep at 45 degrees angle right across the top of the dough. You can get more creative with your scoring as you make more boules.

Use the parchment paper to transfer the dough to the baking pot, spritz with a little water (optional) and put the lid on and bake into the oven at 260C for 20 minutes.

After 20 minutes, remove the lid from the dutch oven or cloche and lower the heat to 230C (450F). Bake uncovered for a further 20 minutes, or until it sounds hollow when you top at the bottom.

Remove the bread from the oven and allow to cool for at least 2 hours before slicing. If you don’t allow it to cool fully, the texture of the bread will be compromised.

Notes:

  • Please always keep in mind that flours differ around the world. Yours may need more or less liquid than mine, just as your oven may behave differently from mine.
  • This sourdough bread recipe offers a rough timeline but will need to be adapted to meet your specific conditions. Ambient temperature, starter strength, and flour type affect fermentation and play a very important role in bread baking.

Lesson learned from this recipe

Now, I understand why many sourdough experts recommend beginners like me to start baking using lower hydration (thicker/stiffer starter). After testing this recipe using my 100% hydration sourdough, I have experienced difficulty shaping and folding my dough. It was so sticky and slack.

Even dough I used a high hydration sourdough, I am very pleased with the results overall. I need to focus on shaping and folding. 😃

 

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4 Comments

  1. I was pretty excited to try this recipe, but unfortunately I had to abandon your method after Step 6 Lamination. The high hydration is very challenging, even after adjusting the water for the humidity in Australia. I continued to do a series of stretch and folds until the dough passed the window pane test. It’s now in the fridge for the overnight proof. Can’t wait to bake and eat it!

     
    • Hi Diana Yes, I’m still also struggling when making high hydration sourdough bread
      And good luck and let me know how your sourdough bread turned out

       
      • Hi Paula, while I’m not completely happy with the shape and texture of the bread, I got a pretty good crumb. I’m currently enjoying it with cream cheese and wine.
        Do you think the 150 grams boiled yam would have added extra hydration? It says baked in the recipe but in the method, boiled.

         
        • Hi, Diana thank you for letting me know.
          I just edited the recipe and changed to boiled (not baked) and yes, I think boiled yam added extra hydration
          I always use extract because it is really difficult to find purple yam here in my location – so I just converted the boiled yam to yam extract.

           

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