How to make Salted Eggs

Salted eggs are a popular preserved condiment and topping in the Philippines, especially for our rice cake called Bibingka and Puto Pao.

We have lockdown for 14 days (maybe more) here in Denmark because of the Coronavirus, so I thought I could make my Project Salted Egg. 😄

Typically made using duck eggs, but it is difficult to find duck eggs here in Denmark, so I am using chicken eggs instead.

Once cooked, the white is hardened but crumbly, while the yolk is rich and salty.

Serving suggestions

Salted eggs can be served as a small side dish with rice or noodles. They can also be used as topping for Bibingka and Puto Pao.

Extra tips:

  • You can use chicken or duck eggs.
  • Make sure the eggs have no cracks.
  • Use sea salt as it dissolves easily. If all you can find or have is table salt, this will work, but this salt will not dissolve completely.
  • The ratio of water to sea salt is 4:1; for every 4 cups water, use 1 cup sea salt. You can easily adjust the recipe to make more or less salted eggs.
  • The brining time varies depending on the size of the eggs. For large eggs, brine for 4 weeks. If using medium eggs, check after 3 weeks. Crack one open, and if the yolk is sold, it’s ready.

How to test if your Salted Eggs are ready

After 21 days, do a taste test. Remove an egg from the brine and place it in a small saucepan covered with cold water. Boil over medium heat for 15 minutes. The Egg is ready if it is salty, and the yolk is a bright yellow-orange color.

Alternatively, crack an egg into a bowl and check its yolk. The yolk should be a bright yellow-orange color and quite firm. The white should be a little cloudy but still runny.

If the eggs are not ready, leave them in the brine for another week.

If you try this recipe, please rate it and leave a comment below. I love hearing from you! You can also follow me on InstagramFacebook, and YouTube to see what I am getting up to.

For 18 servings of Salted eggs, you will need:

  • 12 large eggs
  • 1 cup salt
  • 4 cups water

Procedure:

  1. Clean eggs under running water and check for the cracked egg. Place in a jar and set aside.
  2. Boil water in a large pan. Add the salt gradually to the water and dissolve it. Leave to cool.
  3. Put the cold brine and eggs into a jar; the eggs must be submerged in the brine. I filled a small plastic bag, half full of water. Squeeze as much of the air out as possible. Eggs should be totally submerged. Put the lid on (plus dates info) and store the jar away from heat or cold, preferably at room temperature.
  4. After 28 days, take it out of the jar. They can keep for a long time in that salted condition or the fridge.
  5. They can be used boiled or fried. In a pot, place eggs and boil in enough water for 20 minutes without cover.
  6. Drain eggs and allow them to cool.

Notes:

  • You can use chicken or duck eggs.
  • Make sure the eggs have no cracks.
  • Use sea salt as it dissolves easily. If all you can find or have is table salt, this will work, but this salt will not dissolve completely.
  • The ratio of water to sea salt is 4:1; for every 4 cups water, use 1 cup sea salt. You can easily adjust the recipe to make more or less salted eggs.
  • The brining time varies depending on the size of the eggs. For large eggs, brine for 4 weeks. If using medium eggs, check after 3 weeks. Crack one open, and if the yolk is sold, it’s ready.
 

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